Calvin T. Wheeler

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Calvin T. Wheeler

The late Calvin Thatcher Wheeler (1816-1899) was a Chicago banker, member of the Chicago Board of Trade and president of the exchange during the Civil War.[1] Wheeler organized and served as president of the Continental National Bank, which later became Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Company.[2]

Background

Wheeler was born in West Galaway, New York in 1816. His earliest business career was working for his uncle's story as a clerk.

In 1850 Wheeler set off on a trip to California and its gold fields. He worked as a gold miner for a while, but returned to the St. Louis.

In St. Louis, he was hired by J.T. Flint to open an office in the commission business under the name Flint & Wheeler.

He entered the banking business as vice president of the Union National Bank. He was elected president of the bank when its president died.

Wheeler left Union National Bank and organized Continental National Bank, where he was president for five years.[3]

When Wheeler was president of the CBOT in 1862, President Lincoln called for 300,000 men to be called to arms to fight the Civil War.[4] Wheeler called a meeting of the CBOT in order to secure a pledge for money and influence to recruit a unit would be called the "Board of Trade Battery."

Wheeler built a mansion in Chicago on South Prairie Avenue just prior to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The mansion survived and today has been preserved.[5]

He died on March 24, 1899 and is buried in Chicago's Graceland Cemetary.[6]

Education

Wheeler's primary school education was in New York and Illinois.

References

  1. Our Story. The Wheeler Mansion.
  2. Chicago's First Half Century, 1833-1883. Google Books.
  3. Album of genealogy and biography, Cook County, Illinois. Open Library.
  4. Annual Report of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Volume 56. Google Books.
  5. Know Your Farmers Market:Wheeler Mansion Market. Chicagoist.com.
  6. Calvin T. Wheeler. Findagrave.com.