William S. Warren

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William S. Warren
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The late William Spalding Warren was a member of the Chicago Board of Trade and served as its president for multiple terms.[1]

He died on August 20, 1914 at his home in Hinsdale, IL.

Background

Warren was born in Kalamazoo, MI on May 21, 1852. He moved to Davenport, IA at age 6. He moved to Chicago shortly before his 17th birthday.

He became an employee of the commission house name Spruance, Preston & Company and formed an early association with the activities of the Chicago Board of Trade.

Warren later was associated with the firm of William Young & Company. He left in 1877 and formed his own company and became a member of the CBOT.

In 1883 Warren retired from business, but returned 10 years later when the Chicago's World's Columbian Exposition was in the city. He then formed the company of Hulburd, Warren & Company with Charles H. Hulburd. The firm later became Hulburd, Warren and Chandler.

Warren was president of the CBOT from 1900 to 1902, serving three terms as the member organization. His terms were noted for reforming of the rules of the exchange and successful warfare on the bucket shops.

He spoke at the dedication ceremony for a memorial for the soldiers who were members of the Chicago Board of Trade Battalion during the Civil War in the U.S.

During the dedication on Decoration Day 1901, Warren said:

"It is perhaps to be regretted that these fallen heroes had been left so long without a suitable monument to mark their final resting place and commemorate their deeds of valor and devotion to the country. But there is some compensation in the thought that this occasion, after the long lapse of years, brings us into closer touch with the brave boys, living and dead, of the Board of Trade Battery than could otherwise have happened."

[2]

Warren was a member of the the Union League Club of Chicago and the Chicago Commercial Club.[3]

Education

References

  1. Annual Report of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Volume 57. Google Books.
  2. Monuments and Markers. Rosehill Cemetary.
  3. History of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago: Biographical. Google Books.